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Etz Hayim—"Tree of Life" exists to promote Christian-Jewish relations and dialogue, and a joint biblical, spiritual and liturgical self-consciousness and cooperation.

As Christians, we cannot consider Judaism as a foreign religion; nor do we include the Jews among those called to turn from idols and to serve the true God (cf. 1 Thes 1:9). With them, we believe in the one God who acts in history, and with them we accept his revealed word...

—Pope Francis, Apostolic Exhortation, Evangelii Gaudium
24 Nov. 2013. Read the Document HERE

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JEWISH and CHRISTIAN
LITURGICAL READINGS

The readings list provided by Etz Hayim—"Tree of Life" follows the Torah Portion of the Week (Parashat Hashavuah) read by Jews every Sabbath, and the readings for Masses and Sunday liturgies used throughout the Christian world.

APPROACHING WEEKS’ LITURGICAL CYCLES...

   [JEWISH CYCLE]
02 January / Tevet 18 / Parashat Vayigash
09 January / Tevet 25 / Parashat Shemot
14 January / Shevat 1 / Rosh Chodesh Shevat
16 January / Shevat 3 / Parashat Vaera
23 January / Shevat 10 / Parashat Bo
28 January / Shevat 15 / Tu B'Shevat
30 January / Shevat 17 / Parashat Beshalach
06 February / Shevat 24 / Parashat Yitro
12 February / Shevat 30 / Rosh Chodesh Adar
13 February / Adar 1 / Parashat Mishpatim
20 February / Adar 8 / Parashat Terumah
[Read a commentary on this week’s parashah (Torah potion) from Institute Saint Pierre de Sion-Ratisbonne, Bat Kol-Christian Center for Jewish Studies.]

   [ROMAN RITE]
01 January / Mary Mother of God
03 January / Epiphany or 2nd Sunday after Christmas [Epiphany is celebrated 6th January in some places.
10 January / Baptism of the Lord
17 January / 2nd Sunday Ordinary Time
24 January / 3rd Sunday Ordinary Time
31 January / 4th Sunday Ordinary Time
02 February / Presentation of the Lord
07 February / 5th Sunday Ordinary Time
14 February / 6th Sunday Ordinary Time
17 February / Ash Wednesday
21 February / 1st Sunday of Lent
  [Read a commentary on the gospel from
Institute Saint Pierre de Sion-Ratisbonne,
Bat Kol-Christian Center for Jewish Studies.]

   [RCL]
01 January / Holy Name of Jesus | New Years Day
03 January / 2nd Sunday after Christmas Day
06 January / Epiphany
10 January / Baptism of the Lord
17 January / 2nd Sunday after Epiphany
24 January / 3rd Sunday after Epiphany
31 January / 4th Sunday after Epiphany
02 February / Presentation of the Lord
07 February / 5th Sunday after Epiphany
14 February / Transfiguration Sunday
17 February / Ash Wednesday
21 February / 1st Sunday in Lent

[LINK HERE to Liturgical Readings citations
for the dates above.]


The Hebrew Bible: A Translation with Commentary by Robert Alter.
[PAID LINKS - follow LINKS for detailed book information at Amazon]

 

 

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JEWISH and CHRISTIAN
LITURGICAL CALENDARS

(FOR 2020–2021 Jewish Year 5781–5782)
ENGLISH VERSION

CALENDÁRIO LITÚRGICO
JUDAICO—CRISTÃO

A VERSÃO EM PORTUGUÊS (DO BRASIL)

Weekly Readings
for Christians and Jews
this 16 month interfaith calendar covers
Jewish Year 5781 & Christian Cycle:
Advent 2020–Advent 2021
...

The Jewish and Christian Liturgical Calendar download

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15TH OF THE MONTH OF SHEVAT
NEW YEAR FOR TREES
[28 JANUARY]

Tu BShevat is one of four Jewish New Years. The holiday is connected to the practice of tithing and the establishment of the “legal” age of a tree in order to determine when the fruit should be tithed and when one could eat the produce. Read more...

Pomegranate fruit

“And when ye shall come into the land, and shall have planted all manner of trees for food, then ye shall count the fruit thereof as forbidden; three years shall it be as forbidden unto you; it shall not be eaten. And in the fourth year all the fruit thereof shall be holy, for giving praise unto the LORD. But in the fifth year may ye eat of the fruit thereof...” (Leviticus 19:23-25)

Tu B'Shevat (the word Tu is “15” written in Hebrew “טו”) falls near the beginning of spring after the bulk of the winter rains have fallen and trees are in bud with new growth and fertility.

The holiday is celebrated is different ways.
* Many eat fruit of the land, especially that of the “seven species” grown in Israel.
* New year for trees is also a time to focus on planting trees or raising money to plant trees, especially in Israel.
* In the 17th Century the Kaballists of Safed established a special seder which focused on the esoteric meaning to be found in the biblical statement, “Man is like the tree in the field” (Deut. 20:19). The practice spread among Sephardim and later to Ashkenazim who may celebrate a special seder modelled on the Passover seder on Tu B'Shevat.

Tu B'Shevat is not mentioned in the Torah but is found in the Mishnah in the context of establishing the correct date.

“There are four ‘new year’ days... the First of Shevat is the new year for trees, according to the ruling of Beit Shammai; Beit Hillel, says, the fifteenth of that month.” (Mishnah. Rosh Hashanah 1:1)

 

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     Page Updated: 31 December 2020      
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    Last Site Update: 4 November, 2018 | 26 Cheshvan, 5779
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